Posted by: Idioma Extra | January 31, 2011

Tuesday´s News


Tourism institute targets Chicago, New York and Frisco

From: www.amcostarica.com

 

The Costa Rica Tourism Institute has targeted three cities for a winter campaign.

The first is San Francisco where the Institute authorized the posting of a large mural in the Powell Street metro station.

The other two cities are New York and Chicago where billboards have been erected with 12 different scenes reflecting tourism in Costa Rica.

Also in New York, the Institute said that it contracted with CBS to run a 125-second video on its giant Times Square screen. That ran 1,152 times in the scheduled 32 days, said the Instituto Costarricense de Turismo.

The Institute did not give the costs associated with these projects. In the past, the Institute has used advertising on U.S. buses.

Carlos Ricardo Benavides, the tourism minister, pointed out that the average U.S. tourist takes three months to decide on a vacation and spends two more months getting ready. So this campaign, which began in December and runs through February is aimed to promote tourism in the middle and end of the year.

The Ministry said that the Powell Street station sees 300,000 passersby a day.

Word of the Day

Target
tar·get: \ˈtär-gət\
Verb
Origin: Middle English, from Middle French targette, targuete, diminutive of targe light shield, from Old French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old Norse targa shield
First Known Use: 14th century
1: to make a target of <targeted her for promotion>; especially: to set as a goal
2: to direct or use toward a target

More Vocabulary

Billboard: n. a flat surface (as of a panel, wall, or fence) on which bills are posted; specifically : a large panel designed to carry outdoor advertising
Erect: v.
to cause to stand up or stand out
Passerby: n.
a person who walks by something on a street or road

Below are some common phrases used when speaking on the phone in English. To learn more, consider Idioma Internacional’s AFD 550 Telephoning and Business Communication Course!

Interrupting and Clarifying Phrases

May I interrupt you for a moment?
I wonder if I could comment on that last point?
Excuse me, I´d like to add something here.

Clarification

Correct me if I´m wrong, but…
Basically, what  you´re saying is…

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: