Posted by: Idioma Extra | August 29, 2012

Grammar Guru


Either vs. Neither

Either … or

‘Either … or’ is used in sentences in a positive sense meaning “one or the other, this or that, he or she, etc.” Verb conjugation depends on the subject (singular or plural) closest to the conjugated verb.

Examples:

Either Peter or the girls need to attend the course. (second subject plural)
Either Jane or Matt is going to visit next weekend. (second subject singular)

Neither … nor

‘Neither … nor’ is used in sentences in a negative sense meaning “not this one nor the other, not this nor that, not he nor she, etc.”. Verb conjugation depends on the subject (singular or plural) closest to the conjugated verb.

Examples:

Neither Frank nor Lilly lives in Eugene. (second subject singular)
Neither Axel nor my other friends care about their future. (second subject plural)

Take a quiz here to test your new knowledge! Either vs. Neither Quiz

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